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September 2, 2014

New book forthcoming: October 2014

WGS Professor Ernesto Martínez has co-edited, with Stephanie Fryberg, a groundbreaking new volume of essays on diversity in American higher education. For a summary and additional information, see: The Truly Diverse Faculty: New Dialogues on Diversity in American Higher Education (Palgrave, October 2014)

Advanced praise:

“All university administrators, professors, and educators should read this book! A vital part of creating a “truly diversity faculty” is engaging in difficult dialogues with individuals who—because of race, gender or socioeconomic status—may experience the university differently than those in the mainstream. The Truly Diverse Faculty: New Dialogues in American Higher Education provides engaging and novel perspectives for doing this significant work.” — Hazel Rose Markus, Stanford University

“This unique collaboration-—across both ends of the university hierarchy-—provides critical insights for all those seeking to diversify their college faculty. Finally, here is a frank and open discussion about the challenges. Every administrator and member of a search or tenure committee should read this book.” — Linda Martín Alcoff, Hunter College and the CUNY Graduate School

“This is a superb book, one that will have a major impact on professors and university administrators. The idea behind it — to organize a dialogue between senior administrators and faculty (of color) and junior scholars of color — is a powerful one. What is especially effective is the way the book combines a review of the relevant scholarship with an analysis of subjective experience. It is this combination that makes the practical proposals of the book compelling. And it is the dialogic structure of the book that makes it fun to read, hearing voices that are rarely heard together building on one another’s cadences and meanings. I am frankly quite moved by the experience of reading this book cover to cover and am thinking about how much we can all learn from it.” — Satya Mohanty, Cornell University